Blank Exercise Charts

Karen Frazier
Charting Exercise

Blank exercise charts are useful tools for any exercise regimen. They allow for customization and help you to hold yourself accountable, which are both keys to coming up with - and sticking to - an effective exercise program.

Three Printable Exercise Charts to Use

Charting needs vary based on the type of exercise you're doing. The charts provided here focus on general exercise and a cardio/weight training program, as well as heart rate tracking. They are meant to be downloaded, printed and used as part of a larger exercise log. You can access any of the charts provided here simply by clicking the image. They'll open as browser-based PDF files that you can download, save and customize using the on-screen buttons.

If you need help downloading the printable charts, check out these helpful tips.

Heart Rate Chart

Use this chart to calculate your target heart rate and keep up with it as you are warming up or performing strength training or aerobic exercises.

Weight Training Chart

Use this worksheet to keep an accurate record of your weight training workout routine. Keep up with weight, sets and repetitions, as well as make notes.

General Exercise Chart

Use this document to create a record of your overall time spent working out. Keep up with your cardio and/or weightlifting progress and make notes as needed.

Additional Chart Resources

The above documents are not the only types of exercise charts that you may find useful. Check out the following resources for options specific to children and specialized adult workouts.

Exercise Charts for Kids

With the growing concern over childhood obesity, it's no wonder that more emphasis is being placed on workouts for kids. For children, the point is just to get them moving, so most charts simply have kids write in whatever activity they've participated in.

Try not to be too picky about types of exercise-- walking, running, biking, hiking, and any other active game counts as exercise. Here are a few blank fitness charts for kids:

  • Kid Pointz offers several blank workout charts for kids. Children can record their daily exercise/activities, and parents can decide how many points each activity is worth and what the reward will be. The charts are in PDF format, so you can either print them directly from the screen or save them to your computer.
  • Womens Deals offers a variety of charts to organize your kids, and two are specific to exercise. Both offer incentives for exercise, one offering television time in exchange for exercise and the other offering video game minutes.

Exercise Charts for Adults

Most of these charts focus on either strength training or cardiovascular workouts, but some provide space for both.

  • Vertex42 offers blank charts that can be used to track running and walking activity levels. Chart your time by date, progress, distance and other relevant factors based on activity type.
  • College Body Building provides a downloadable blank chart where you can record the type of weight lifting exercise you did and how many you did at each weight in a specific set.
  • Spine Universe has an exercise chart geared towards seniors, but anyone desiring a more active lifestyle could use it. This chart lists specific activities, such as brisk walking, tennis, bowling, stair climbing, and swimming. Scroll down to find the chart, right click, and select "save as."

Effort Generates Results

Regardless of the chart you select, a table or chart is only as good as the effort you make. Your chart will get you on the right track, but you have to actually do the exercises to garner results.

Blank Exercise Charts